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5 companies that won’t ask you any salary history questions

Amazon recently announced it would no longer ask job applicants questions about their salary. These other tech companies have similar interview policies in place.

5 companies that won’t ask you any salary history questions

It’s often impolite to ask someone, “How much money do you make?” Especially in the workplace, there are some surprising dangers of discussing pay.

So why doesn’t the same policy apply to job interviews?

It’s quite common for questions about salary history to come up when you’re applying for a job. It can also be very uncomfortable to try to dance your way around the answer so you don’t put yourself in a hole when you’re negotiating salary in your job offer down the road. Wouldn’t it be nice to skip the dance entirely? In certain places, you can.

Some states, including California, Delaware, Massachusetts, (goes into effect July 2018), and Oregon (goes into effect January 2019), as well as cities, including New York City, San Francisco (goes into effect July 2018) and Philadelphia (effective date has yet to be set), have made it illegal for any company to ask salary history questions.

As for people looking for jobs in the rest of the country, some companies have banned salary history questions altogether, with Amazon as the most recent example.

The e-commerce giant ended salary history inquiries at the beginning of 2018, BuzzFeed reports, not just for jobs at its global headquarters in Seattle, but also for all positions in all of its national offices. Amazon says hiring managers and recruiters can no longer “directly or indirectly ask candidates about their current or prior base pay, bonus, equity compensation, variable pay or benefits” or “use salary history information as a factor in determining whether or not to offer employment and what compensation to offer a candidate.”

Amazon’s not alone in ditching the money question. Monster rounded up five companies—all in the technology sector—that have banned salary history inquiries and included the top jobs and cities the companies are hiring for. Check out the list below to see if some of these would be a good fit for you.

Amazon

Frequently hiring for these jobs: Software developers, computer systems engineers, customer service representatives, warehouse associates, security engineers

Frequently hiring in these cities: Seattle; New York City; Sunnyvale, California; Washington, DC; Boston

Find all Amazon jobs on Monster.

Cisco

Frequently hiring for these jobs: Software developers, computer systems engineers, sales representatives, sales managers, marketing managers

Frequently hiring in these cities: San Jose, California; San Francisco; Boston, Dallas; Atlanta

Find all Cisco jobs on Monster.

Facebook

Frequently hiring for these jobs: Marketing managers, software developers, market research analysts, IT project managers, computer research scientists

Frequently hiring in these cities: San Francisco; Seattle; New York City; Austin, Texas; Los Angeles        

Find all Facebook jobs on Monster.

GoDaddy

Frequently hiring for these jobs: Software developers, marketing managers, UX designers, web developers, business analysts

Frequently hiring in these cities: Phoenix; Seattle; Sunnyvale, California; Los Angeles; Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Find all GoDaddy jobs on Monster.

Google

Frequently hiring for these jobs: Software developers, market research analysts, IT project managers, UX designers, sales representatives

Frequently hiring in these cities: Sunnyvale, California; San Francisco; New York City; Seattle; Chicago

Find all Google jobs on Monster.

So if these employers aren’t asking about your salary, what will they ask during your interview? Check out Monster’s list of the top 100 interview questions—and how to answer them.

And while you’re at it, join Monster today, so you can get practical, personalized career advice like this sent right to your inbox.


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