Auburn, NY Employment Information

Auburn, New York Overview Auburn is sometimes called "history's hometown," because American icons Harriet Tubman and ...

Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Load more jobs

Auburn, New York Overview

Auburn is sometimes called "history's hometown," because American icons Harriet Tubman and William H. Seward both lived there while helping slaves get to freedom on the Underground Railroad. Seward bought Alaska from Russia and specifically assisted Tubman by selling her some land used to house family and friends, plus other African-Americans who were seeking better lives in the North. The Case Research Lab is also in Auburn and considered the birthplace of talking films.

Auburn Job Opportunities

Auburn's largest employment sectors include hospitality and manufacturing. The Auburn Community Hospital offers in-patient and outpatient services and many healthcare jobs in Auburn. NUCOR Steel and Currier Plastics also have facilities in Auburn, so you may find a manufacturing career through one of those companies or a similar option. There are almost 50 educational institutions within 60 miles of Auburn, including Rochester Institute of Technology and Syracuse University, which provides plenty of Syracuse jobs.

The city is an international tourism destination, likely due to its scenic location at the north end of Owasco Lake, part of the famous Finger Lakes. Plans are underway to build a walking trail along the lake as well. Catering to tourists and residents alike, it will wind through Auburn's thriving downtown district. If you're eyeing a career in tourism or education, Auburn might also be a great fit.

Auburn Employment Trends

In 2012, the median estimated annual income was 37,661. Just a decade earlier, it was only $30,281. The population has also grown 4.2 percent since 2000. Auburn's population was 27,365 at the time of the 2012 Census, and its unemployment rate was 6.1 percent in April 2014. Together, the income boost and population growth suggest the job market will be favorable for people considering moving to Auburn for work or education.

Auburn Cost of Living

If your goal is to live comfortably on a budget, Auburn just might be the place for you. Some places in New York are very expensive, but Auburn is refreshingly not among that group. The cost of living there is 31.9 percent less than the rest of New York, and 15 percent lower than the national average. Housing costs are especially attractive compared to other areas of the state. The average price of homes is $110,000, and commuting times are less than a half-hour. Since Auburn is a very pedestrian-friendly place, you might be able to walk to your most frequented destinations.

  1. Auburn