Exercise Science Employment Information

Exercise Science Job Overview Professionals who hold exercise science jobs are often fitness trainers or instructors. ...

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Exercise Science Job Overview

Professionals who hold exercise science jobs are often fitness trainers or instructors. They work with individuals and groups to lead them in physical exercise activities that include stretching, strength training, and cardiovascular exercise. These professionals demonstrate exercises and fitness routines, teach clients correct movements and techniques, and monitor clients' progress over the course of a fitness program. They also counsel clients on weight control and nutrition, and they teach clients safe exercise and weight lifting methods. Fitness trainers and instructors are also responsible for administering first aid when necessary.

Exercise Science Job Education Requirements

To become a fitness instructor, most professionals must have at least a high school diploma. Some employers require an associate's or a bachelor's degree in exercise science, physical education, or a related field. Many fitness trainers are also certified to teach certain kinds of exercise or fitness styles.

Exercise Science Job Market

The job market for exercise science professionals will likely continue to grow at an average rate. One of the biggest factors contributing to growth in the field is an increasing demand for ways to stay healthy while living a busy life. Both private and corporate gyms will continue to provide people with convenient fitness options. To stay competitive and meet a demand, some fitness instructors may choose to offer exercise classes and specialized training for groups like the elderly.

Exercise Science Job Salary Information

According to the Bureau for Labor Statistics, the average annual wage for exercise science professionals is about $32,000 a year. Fitness instructors at the top of their field earn over $66,000 a year, while entry-level and part-time fitness trainers earn less than $17,000 a year. Many fitness trainers work full-time, but some work other jobs during the day and work as fitness professionals during evenings or on weekends.

  1. Exercise Science