Property Inspector Employment Information

Property Inspector Overview Property inspectors are tasked with the job of inspecting a home before a potential buyer ...

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Property Inspector Overview

Property inspectors are tasked with the job of inspecting a home before a potential buyer makes a down payment. Their responsibility is to ensure there are no major structural or design problems with a home that will cost the buyer money in the long run. Property inspectors who work for apartment complexes are in charge of ensuring that all wiring is properly secured, there are no plumbing leaks, all appliances are functional and accounted for, and there are no obvious signs of damage from previous tenants.

Property Inspector Educational Requirements

To become a property inspector, someone needs at minimum a high school diploma or a GED. Education for this job comes more in the form of on-the-job training than anything else, but a few traits make it easier to land the position. Organization and an eye for detail are helpful; inspectors who can notice small things being out of place are good at identifying potential problems before they become more severe. A willingness to interact with people on a regular basis is also important as property inspectors often find themselves working closely with homeowners.

Property Inspector Job Market

According to statistics, property inspector job opportunities are expected to grow around 5 percent within the next 10 years. As the housing bubble still hasn't recovered, more people are buying foreclosed homes at discounts, and these homes often have problems that property inspectors are called in to evaluate. Due to the growth in military enlistment, many apartment complexes are springing up in areas around military facilities, and as a result, they are hiring more property inspectors to ensure the quality of the locations remains up to par. Similar positions include Commercial Property Inspections jobs.

Property Inspector Salary

Property inspectors make, on average, around $35,000 per year. Entry-level inspectors might make slightly less, and more experienced inspectors can often bring in up to $40,000 per year, or around $20 per hour.

  1. Property Inspector