Shift Manager Employment Information

Shift Manager Overview Though the exact duties of a shift manager vary between jobs, several common tasks remain the ...

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Shift Manager Overview

Though the exact duties of a shift manager vary between jobs, several common tasks remain the same. Shift managers are responsible for scheduling other employees and ensuring they arrive to work on time. Shift managers are also responsible for upholding work standards, dealing with customer complaints, and other various leadership positions. Shift managers are usually promoted into their position after gaining experience in the industry working as store associates and in retail sales.

Shift Manager Education Requirements

Generally, shift managers need no more than a high school diploma or GED certificate. The most important factor is work experience. After several years or less on the job, a particularly exemplary worker can be promoted into the position. Clear communication and leadership skills are vital to become a shift manager as employees must respect the decisions the shift manager makes. Punctuality and organizational abilities are also beneficial for shift managers who wish to advance further up the corporate ladder.

Shift Manager Job Market

The job outlook for shift managers is expected to increase by 4 percent by 2022, resulting in an estimated 41,980 new jobs each year. Shift managers are employed in all industries, from fast food to retail sales. If there is an industry that employs multiple workers across multiple shifts, a shift manager is almost guaranteed to be involved in some capacity or another.

Shift Manager Salary

The median hourly wage of shift managers is between $8 and $16 an hour, but some firms may offer more. The annual salary is roughly $55,000 although some places will pay shift managers up to $74,000 per year. The wage of the shift manager is largely dependent upon their experience and the size of their employer, as well as the industry. Shift managers involved in commercial production stand to make quite a bit more than their counterparts working in retail positions.

  1. Shift Manager