Amarillo, TX Employment Information

Amarillo, Texas Overview Amarillo was established in 1887 along the Fort Worth and Denver City Railroad. Known as "The ...

Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved

Interviewer

Amarillo, TX
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Applied Saved
Load more jobs

Amarillo, Texas Overview

Amarillo was established in 1887 along the Fort Worth and Denver City Railroad. Known as "The Yellow Rose of Texas," the metropolitan area's 258,700 residents experience a small city with big, Old West style and cultural richness. Amarillo is one of the smallest American cities surrounded by a loop highway and housing an international airport. Natural attractions like the Palo Duro Canyon State Park and the Alibates Flint Quarries National Museum offer awe-inspiring views, while the Cadillac Ranch and Big Texas Steak Ranch entertain. Plus, for the artsy crowd, the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museums claims the largest Western art collection in the state.

The cost of living in Amarillo is 5.4 percent lower than the national average. Utilities and housing, at figures of 82 and 57, respectively, prove significantly more affordable than the national average of 100. Amarillo's median household income is $48,276, and household income was up 1.1 percent last year. The median home price in 2013 was $137,300, representing a 3.0 percent positive change in home value.

Amarillo Job Opportunities

Amarillo, TX jobs feature a comprehensive mix of manufacturers, distribution companies, educational facilities, agricultural business and healthcare outlets that drive the Texas Panhandle's economy. The Amarillo Independent School District is the number one employer with around 4,282 employed. Tyson Foods, Inc. employs about 3,700 in meat packing and processing, one of the largest Amarillo since approximately a quarter of the United States' beef is processed there. B&W Pantex currently maintains 3,200 jobs in Amarillo. Since the Texas Panhandle area contains what's considered the largest natural gas volume in the States, the petroleum extraction industry remains lucrative among Amarillo jobs. The Pantex Plant is the only nuclear weapon assembly and disassembly facility in the country.

Positions at Baptist St. Anthony's Healthcare Center, Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., and Affiliated Foods round out some of the other popular jobs in Amarillo, TX. Still, Amarillo and surrounding counties are major commuter areas. With West Texas A&M University and major agricultural development, consider Canyon jobs in your career search.

Amarillo Employment Trends

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that Amarillo's unemployment rate is 4.0 percent, which is lower than Texas average of 5.3 percent and the national average of 6.1 percent. In 2013 Amarillo jobs grew at a rate of 0.9 percent, and for this year, projections increase job growth to a rate of 2.5 percent.

Amarillo impresses on Forbes' list of best small cities for business and careers in 32nd place overall while the city ranks 62nd for job growth and 38th for job growth. Once known as the "Helium Capital of the World" for its extensive helium mining industry, now education, energy, healthcare, agriculture and meat processing, as well as manufacturing jobs in Amarillo sustain the economy.

  1. Amarillo